Divorce is a stressful and confusing time for children. They usually feel sad, fearful, guilty and angry at their parents for deciding to get separated or to divorce. As a parent you can make the process and its effects less painful for your children. Helping your child to cope with divorce means providing stability and attending to your child’s needs with reassurance. By providing routines kids can rely on, children are reminded that they can count on youfor stability, structure and care. Listening, empathy, patience and reassurance can minimize your child’s distress and help them learn to cope and adjust to new circumstances. A working relationship with your ex-spouse will assist in reducing children’s exposure to the harm that conflict between parents have. This may be challenging considering the transitional period you are in but can powerfully influence the way in which your child learns to cope with the situation.

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We have become accustomed to the fairy tale endings we so often see in the movies – boy meets girl, they fall in love, get married, have kids and live happily ever after. Unfortunately, the reality of modern society is not always as romantic with a dramatic increase in the number of single and unmarried parents and children born out of wedlock every year. This raises questions as to whether the biological father of a child born out of wedlock is obliged to contribute to the mother’s pregnancy and birth related costs and pay maintenance for his child even if not married to the mother.

In legal terms, a child born to a mother and father who are not married to each other is referred to as a child born out of wedlock, or, more correctly, as an extra-marital child. Our law recognises that all children irrespective of the marriage status of the parents are entitled to financial support from both of their biological parents, with the degree of contribution by each parent dependent on their respective means.

READ MORE: Is the biological farther...